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Reblogged from mare-vitae  215,833 notes
fightingforanimals:

crowvo:

havocados:

apologetikerfeind:

refusingtobeaman:

havocados:

veg-anna:

suicunecutie:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.STOP. STOP NOW.DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?So now.Support beekeepers.Support bees.buzz.

I think a few ppl took Bee Movie too seriously.

Can a knowledgable vegan tackle this post please? I can’t imagine this is logical.



Yes, I can and I have several issues with that.
Wild bees exist. Many different races, on top of that. Bees do not fucking need human support to live.
The whole "without us bees will die" argument is wrong, because bees literally die because of us spraying pesticides on plants while bees are out pollinating 
and because humans feed them substitutes instead of letting them nurture their young with honey. (that’s 2 links)
There is more than enough cruelty involved in honey.
HONEY
IS 
NOT 
VEGAN
Watch the more than honey documentary and shut the goddamn hell up forever.

this needs to be reblogged thousands of times with that takedown because I’m god damn tired of seeing thousands of notes on these misguided anti vegan posts when what matters here are the bees, not how humans are their saviors

I can’t let this go, because whenever a vegan pulls this shit it always baffles me. I live on an apiary, for Christ’s sakes, so it’s always fascinating to see some jackoff on the internet telling me how beekeepers operate.Wild bees exist, but their population is not this massively impressive, sustained population. You can thank logging and development for that.While it is true that bees die because of us, and honestly, NO ONE IS ARGUING AGAINST THAT. THE ENTIRE SAVE THE BEES DEBATE IS ABOUT THE FACT THAT BEES ARE BEING KILLED BY PESTICIDES. It blows my goddamn mind that vegans wanna hop on that bandwagon and act like people don’t get it. Everyone gets it. Even Monsanto gets it, Monsanto just doesn’t give a flying fuck.The ONLY time that beekeepers have to give a honey-substitute to bees is when a winter is particularly harsh and the bees deplete their resources. NO beekeeper “steals” all of the honey and leaves them with sugar water. We’re not evil villains twirling mustaches while laughing for fucks sakes.Because at the end of the day, it’s a business. And vegans, apparently, believe that the world is not driven by capitalism, and that we can magically wish away capitalism with a flick of the goddamn wrist.What happens if we do away with beekeepers and just ‘let nature’ decide?Well, for starters, this leaves all bee populations to the whim of every other industry. No place for the bees to move in? Well, they’ll try to move onto people’s properties and build wild hives. And then get exterminated. Because people feel threatened by bee hives.But the biggest, most damning thing, the thing that makes it so utterly irrational that vegans would be blogging AGAINST beekeeping, is that your entire goddamn diet REVOLVES around beekeepers.Every single crop that requires insect pollination? Farms have beekeepers bring their bees to do that. Guess what happens without beekeepers? Can’t mass-pollinate as easily. Those wild bee populations don’t settle in close to humans because they’ll be taken down by exterminators, and butterflies and bumblebees don’t even come CLOSE to the pollinating power of honeybees.When bees get an excess of honey? They get aggressive. It’s so they can defend their honey, of course. If you don’t harvest some, they just keep growing and getting more honey, because there aren’t days off for them. So then you get massive, unwieldy bee hives that are giant beacons for wildlife to pulverize.What you SHOULD be campaigning against, vegans, is Monsanto. Because if the beekeepers vanish, do you know what remains? Monsanto. And the bees still get to enjoy breathing in all of those fantastically lethal chemicals, only now without there being a viable commercial reason to give a shit about them. On top of that, the bees lose out on protection and, indeed, on concerned businesses convincing politicians to stop Monsanto.It is goddamn frustrating to me. Our bees produced 700 pounds of excess honey this year. 700 pounds. Their reserves are filled to burst because we don’t like to have to feed them a substitute. Hell, we’ve only had to give them substitute once, for two weeks.I hate it when people talk clean out their ass. The person who posted all of those sources, which, FYI, the non-vegan sources? Explain what honey does. They do NOT even talk about honey substitute, they just talk about what honey does for bees. Scare tactic bullshit. The person who posted all of that deleted their blog. Jesus, they must have really believed their bullshit confidently!Don’t just lap up vegan propaganda. There are PLENTY of viable reasons to be vegan, and hey, I’m not saying you -should- eat honey if you’re vegan. But don’t you DARE try to tout this bullshit as “fact”. The only things hurt by this, are the bees. Hate it all that we want, at this point, the bees DO need us, because if we didn’t need them, you know for a fact we’d wipe them out. We’re a disgusting race hellbent on slaughtering whatever doesn’t suit us. If we didn’t use bees for agriculture and honey? Holy shit, they’re annoying stinging motherfuckers, we’d probably have tons of pesticides designed specifically to kill them.Sorry that I ranted about that, just, fuck man. I can’t stand vegan propaganda aimed at honeybees. It invariably signs a death sentence for honeybees every single time.

Under natural conditions, if the hive were producing a surplus, they would divide into two colonies and there would be none wasted. Nonetheless, it is important to regard beekeepers as potential allies. They are often more aware of environmental concerns than other people and may truly care about their bees. A few simple changes in their attitudes would likely make their behavior acceptable to vegans, although making those changes is not a simple thing. They would need to stop regarding themselves as beeKEEPERS. They would also need to recognize that their role is largely temporary, as a stop gap measure until farmers get their act together and facilitate the growth of native pollinator populations. They should immediately switch to top bar hives, discourage surplus honey production and stop stealing honey. Otherwise, there is too much incentive to exploit the bees and the environment. Top bar hives are less high tech than Langstroth hives, result in less surplus honey, and the users generally have a different mindset (Satterfield;Caldeira, An Alternative to Conventional Beekeeping). 
Keep these things in mind if you are thinking buying locally grown honey from a small apiary—although they are better than large commercial apiaries, they still may share many of the objectionable philosophies. (How much respect can you have for someone if you are taking advantage of her?) Finally, beekeeping varies due to the different environments in which it occurs. Beekeepers are an opinionated group (like vegans). Just because one beekeeper tells you that one of the practices described is horrible and something he would never do, doesn’t mean that another beekeeper thinks he is foolish not to.
Even though honeybees are currently used as pollinators, it is problematic for a number of reasons and should be stopped. The whole enterprise is risky as new diseases can be imported and rapidly diminish the honeybee population. This has already occurred—feral (wild) honeybee populations are virtually nonexistent (1994 Watanabe, M. (1994).  Pollination worries rise as honey bees decline.  Science, 265, 1170).  Pollination worries rise as honey bees decline, most recently due to the illegal importation of South American queens infected with two types of mites (tracheal and Varroa) (Nickens 22 Beyond the birds and the bees (mites destroying American honey bee populations and upsetting the food web). Audubon, 98 (5), 22-4.;Watanabe). Even if these problems can be controlled in managed colonies, it may be only temporary. “[Varroa] mites in four states have developed resistance to the one pesticide approved for use against them, notes Thomas E. Rinderer of the U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee laboratory in Baton Rouge, La.” (Raloff, Russian Queens Bee-little Mites’ Impact. Science News. 154, 84). Honeybees will become increasingly dependent on the beekeeper as new threats appear. Beekeepers can take steps to reduce the spread of diseases but do not or cannot. For example, the Varroa mite “will continue to spread because of the commercial transport of bees and queens; the migratory activities of beekeepers; swarms that may fly long distances, or be carried by ships or aircraft; and drifting bees” (Shimanuki, H. et al. (Research Leader, Bee Research Laboratory, USDA) (1992). Diseases and Pests of Honey Bees. The Hive and the honey bee. J. Graham (ed). Hamilton, IL: Dadant.).
Honeybees are not even the best choice of pollinator for many crops. Honeybees do not trip alfalfa flowers (as the Alfalfa leafcutter bees and the Alkali bees do). Honeybees cannot use the buzz pollination (the vigorous vibration used by bumblebees) necessary to efficiently pollinate tomatoes, eggplants, potatoes, peppers, blueberries, watermelon, and cranberries. Honeybees cannot fly at low temperatures (like the orchard mason bee) to efficiently pollinate early-spring blooms like blueberries, the first apple bloom and almonds. This is not to imply that honeybees are not used to pollinate these crops, just that other insects could do a much better job.
Initially the consequences of the loss of the honeybee are negative. Insects are necessary to pollinate about 15% of our food crops and honeybees currently fill a lot of that role (Adee, R. (President, American Honey Producers Association) (1992, July 30). Review of the U.S. Honey Program.). Humans are not the only ones affected.  “John T. Ambrose, an entomologist at North Carolina State University, estimates that 15 to 20 percent of a black bear’s diet comes from honey, bees, and bee-pollinated fruits, nuts, and berries. A 20 percent decline in that food source could force the bears to range farther for forage” (Nickens). “‘The basic protein and carbohydrate base in the ecosystem is going down,’ says Rinderer [director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Honeybee Breeding and Genetics Laboratory in Baton Rouge, Louisiana], ‘and everything else will go down from there.’ A 50 percent reduction in insect-pollinated food supplies, he says, is ‘entirely reasonable’” (Nickens). Of course, these impacts would have already occurred to a large extent because there are virtually no feral honeybee colonies left, since honeybees now require human intervention to survive in North America.
Ultimately, however, the reduction of honeybee populations would be positive because they crowd out native bee species. Honeybees are not native to North America. It is believed that they were imported from Europe in 1638 (National Honey Board (US).  Honey History Facts.). Native Americans called them “white man’s flies.” Feral honeybees developed through the natural process of swarming. When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are indeed. They are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees—much to the detriment of other pollinators (Buchmann, S. (USDA Carl Haydon Bee Research Center) (1996). Competition between honey bees and native bees in the Sonoran Desert and global bee conservation issues. Andrew Matheson et al. (eds.), The Conservation of Bees.). “The potential ecological effects of honeybees are likely minor compared to major changes such as deforestation, but they may be important because honeybees are nearly cosmopolitan and they may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species (Paine, 1966; Thorp & Gordon, 1992; Thorp et al., 1994)" (Sugden, E. (Tura-Lura Apiaries) (1996).  In Andrew Matheson et al. (eds.), The Conservation of Bees.). As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. Studies led by William Schaffer, a University of Arizona ecologist, clearly showed a significant negative impact on local pollinators when honeybee colonies were introduced (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996). The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28.). There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996).  The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28; Sugden; Kato M, Shibata A, Yasui T, Nagamasu H. (1999). Impact of introduced honeybees, Apis mellifera, upon native bee communities in the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands.Researches on Population Ecology. 41, 217-228.). The interspecies competition is difficult to conclusively prove for a variety of reasons. However, of 24 major competition studies only two discounted competitive effects and even these authors did not dismiss the possibility of its existence (Buchmann).
Honeybees steal pollen and nectar from other pollinators, but honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996).  The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28.).
Loss of the native pollinators would be bad because honeybees only pollinate 16-22% of all wild plants needing pollination (Roubik, D. (Smithsonian Tropical Resaerch Institute) (1996).  In A. Matheson et al. (eds.),  The Conservation of Bees.). In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees (Sugden).
Buchmann & Nabham conclude, “the honeybee has perhaps had as much impact as cattle on the structure of certain plant communities. It may be apocalyptic to claim that someday beekeeping with either European or Africanized honeybees will be discussed in the United States or Mexico with as much emotion as cowboying is today, but that is indeed our prophecy. [It is already true in Australia.] (Buchmann).
References bolded so you can see we’re not just ‘pulling this shit’.
 

fightingforanimals:

crowvo:

havocados:

apologetikerfeind:

refusingtobeaman:

havocados:

veg-anna:

suicunecutie:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.

STOP. STOP NOW.
DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?

Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.

I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. 
Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. 
Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?

So now.
Support beekeepers.
Support bees.

buzz.

I think a few ppl took Bee Movie too seriously.

Can a knowledgable vegan tackle this post please? I can’t imagine this is logical.

Yes, I can and I have several issues with that.

Wild bees exist. Many different races, on top of that. Bees do not fucking need human support to live.

The whole "without us bees will die" argument is wrong, because bees literally die because of us spraying pesticides on plants while bees are out pollinating

and because humans feed them substitutes instead of letting them
nurture their young with honey.
(that’s 2 links)


There is more than enough cruelty involved in honey.

HONEY

IS

NOT

VEGAN

Watch the more than honey documentary and shut the goddamn hell up forever.

this needs to be reblogged thousands of times with that takedown because I’m god damn tired of seeing thousands of notes on these misguided anti vegan posts when what matters here are the bees, not how humans are their saviors

I can’t let this go, because whenever a vegan pulls this shit it always baffles me. I live on an apiary, for Christ’s sakes, so it’s always fascinating to see some jackoff on the internet telling me how beekeepers operate.

Wild bees exist, but their population is not this massively impressive, sustained population. You can thank logging and development for that.

While it is true that bees die because of us, and honestly, NO ONE IS ARGUING AGAINST THAT. THE ENTIRE SAVE THE BEES DEBATE IS ABOUT THE FACT THAT BEES ARE BEING KILLED BY PESTICIDES. It blows my goddamn mind that vegans wanna hop on that bandwagon and act like people don’t get it. Everyone gets it. Even Monsanto gets it, Monsanto just doesn’t give a flying fuck.


The ONLY time that beekeepers have to give a honey-substitute to bees is when a winter is particularly harsh and the bees deplete their resources. NO beekeeper “steals” all of the honey and leaves them with sugar water. We’re not evil villains twirling mustaches while laughing for fucks sakes.

Because at the end of the day, it’s a business. And vegans, apparently, believe that the world is not driven by capitalism, and that we can magically wish away capitalism with a flick of the goddamn wrist.

What happens if we do away with beekeepers and just ‘let nature’ decide?

Well, for starters, this leaves all bee populations to the whim of every other industry. No place for the bees to move in? Well, they’ll try to move onto people’s properties and build wild hives. And then get exterminated. Because people feel threatened by bee hives.

But the biggest, most damning thing, the thing that makes it so utterly irrational that vegans would be blogging AGAINST beekeeping, is that your entire goddamn diet REVOLVES around beekeepers.

Every single crop that requires insect pollination? Farms have beekeepers bring their bees to do that. Guess what happens without beekeepers? Can’t mass-pollinate as easily. Those wild bee populations don’t settle in close to humans because they’ll be taken down by exterminators, and butterflies and bumblebees don’t even come CLOSE to the pollinating power of honeybees.

When bees get an excess of honey? They get aggressive. It’s so they can defend their honey, of course. If you don’t harvest some, they just keep growing and getting more honey, because there aren’t days off for them. So then you get massive, unwieldy bee hives that are giant beacons for wildlife to pulverize.

What you SHOULD be campaigning against, vegans, is Monsanto. Because if the beekeepers vanish, do you know what remains? Monsanto. And the bees still get to enjoy breathing in all of those fantastically lethal chemicals, only now without there being a viable commercial reason to give a shit about them. On top of that, the bees lose out on protection and, indeed, on concerned businesses convincing politicians to stop Monsanto.

It is goddamn frustrating to me. Our bees produced 700 pounds of excess honey this year. 700 pounds. Their reserves are filled to burst because we don’t like to have to feed them a substitute. Hell, we’ve only had to give them substitute once, for two weeks.

I hate it when people talk clean out their ass. The person who posted all of those sources, which, FYI, the non-vegan sources? Explain what honey does. They do NOT even talk about honey substitute, they just talk about what honey does for bees. Scare tactic bullshit. The person who posted all of that deleted their blog. Jesus, they must have really believed their bullshit confidently!

Don’t just lap up vegan propaganda. There are PLENTY of viable reasons to be vegan, and hey, I’m not saying you -should- eat honey if you’re vegan. But don’t you DARE try to tout this bullshit as “fact”. The only things hurt by this, are the bees. Hate it all that we want, at this point, the bees DO need us, because if we didn’t need them, you know for a fact we’d wipe them out. We’re a disgusting race hellbent on slaughtering whatever doesn’t suit us. If we didn’t use bees for agriculture and honey? Holy shit, they’re annoying stinging motherfuckers, we’d probably have tons of pesticides designed specifically to kill them.

Sorry that I ranted about that, just, fuck man. I can’t stand vegan propaganda aimed at honeybees. It invariably signs a death sentence for honeybees every single time.

Under natural conditions, if the hive were producing a surplus, they would divide into two colonies and there would be none wasted. Nonetheless, it is important to regard beekeepers as potential allies. They are often more aware of environmental concerns than other people and may truly care about their bees. A few simple changes in their attitudes would likely make their behavior acceptable to vegans, although making those changes is not a simple thing. They would need to stop regarding themselves as beeKEEPERS. They would also need to recognize that their role is largely temporary, as a stop gap measure until farmers get their act together and facilitate the growth of native pollinator populations. They should immediately switch to top bar hives, discourage surplus honey production and stop stealing honey. Otherwise, there is too much incentive to exploit the bees and the environment. Top bar hives are less high tech than Langstroth hives, result in less surplus honey, and the users generally have a different mindset (Satterfield;CaldeiraAn Alternative to Conventional Beekeeping)

Keep these things in mind if you are thinking buying locally grown honey from a small apiary—although they are better than large commercial apiaries, they still may share many of the objectionable philosophies. (How much respect can you have for someone if you are taking advantage of her?) Finally, beekeeping varies due to the different environments in which it occurs. Beekeepers are an opinionated group (like vegans). Just because one beekeeper tells you that one of the practices described is horrible and something he would never do, doesn’t mean that another beekeeper thinks he is foolish not to.

Even though honeybees are currently used as pollinators, it is problematic for a number of reasons and should be stopped. The whole enterprise is risky as new diseases can be imported and rapidly diminish the honeybee population. This has already occurred—feral (wild) honeybee populations are virtually nonexistent (1994 Watanabe, M. (1994).  Pollination worries rise as honey bees decline.  Science, 265, 1170).  Pollination worries rise as honey bees decline, most recently due to the illegal importation of South American queens infected with two types of mites (tracheal and Varroa) (Nickens 22 Beyond the birds and the bees (mites destroying American honey bee populations and upsetting the food web). Audubon, 98 (5), 22-4.;Watanabe). Even if these problems can be controlled in managed colonies, it may be only temporary. “[Varroa] mites in four states have developed resistance to the one pesticide approved for use against them, notes Thomas E. Rinderer of the U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee laboratory in Baton Rouge, La.” (Raloff, Russian Queens Bee-little Mites’ Impact. Science News. 154, 84). Honeybees will become increasingly dependent on the beekeeper as new threats appear. Beekeepers can take steps to reduce the spread of diseases but do not or cannot. For example, the Varroa mite “will continue to spread because of the commercial transport of bees and queens; the migratory activities of beekeepers; swarms that may fly long distances, or be carried by ships or aircraft; and drifting bees” (Shimanuki, H. et al. (Research Leader, Bee Research Laboratory, USDA) (1992). Diseases and Pests of Honey Bees. The Hive and the honey bee. J. Graham (ed). Hamilton, IL: Dadant.).

Honeybees are not even the best choice of pollinator for many crops. Honeybees do not trip alfalfa flowers (as the Alfalfa leafcutter bees and the Alkali bees do). Honeybees cannot use the buzz pollination (the vigorous vibration used by bumblebees) necessary to efficiently pollinate tomatoes, eggplants, potatoes, peppers, blueberries, watermelon, and cranberries. Honeybees cannot fly at low temperatures (like the orchard mason bee) to efficiently pollinate early-spring blooms like blueberries, the first apple bloom and almonds. This is not to imply that honeybees are not used to pollinate these crops, just that other insects could do a much better job.

Initially the consequences of the loss of the honeybee are negative. Insects are necessary to pollinate about 15% of our food crops and honeybees currently fill a lot of that role (Adee, R. (President, American Honey Producers Association) (1992, July 30). Review of the U.S. Honey Program.). Humans are not the only ones affected.  “John T. Ambrose, an entomologist at North Carolina State University, estimates that 15 to 20 percent of a black bear’s diet comes from honey, bees, and bee-pollinated fruits, nuts, and berries. A 20 percent decline in that food source could force the bears to range farther for forage” (Nickens). “‘The basic protein and carbohydrate base in the ecosystem is going down,’ says Rinderer [director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Honeybee Breeding and Genetics Laboratory in Baton Rouge, Louisiana], ‘and everything else will go down from there.’ A 50 percent reduction in insect-pollinated food supplies, he says, is ‘entirely reasonable’” (Nickens). Of course, these impacts would have already occurred to a large extent because there are virtually no feral honeybee colonies left, since honeybees now require human intervention to survive in North America.

Ultimately, however, the reduction of honeybee populations would be positive because they crowd out native bee species. Honeybees are not native to North America. It is believed that they were imported from Europe in 1638 (National Honey Board (US).  Honey History Facts.). Native Americans called them “white man’s flies.” Feral honeybees developed through the natural process of swarming. When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are indeed. They are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees—much to the detriment of other pollinators (Buchmann, S. (USDA Carl Haydon Bee Research Center) (1996). Competition between honey bees and native bees in the Sonoran Desert and global bee conservation issues. Andrew Matheson et al. (eds.), The Conservation of Bees.). “The potential ecological effects of honeybees are likely minor compared to major changes such as deforestation, but they may be important because honeybees are nearly cosmopolitan and they may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species (Paine, 1966; Thorp & Gordon, 1992; Thorp et al., 1994)" (Sugden, E. (Tura-Lura Apiaries) (1996).  In Andrew Matheson et al. (eds.), The Conservation of Bees.). As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. Studies led by William Schaffer, a University of Arizona ecologist, clearly showed a significant negative impact on local pollinators when honeybee colonies were introduced (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996). The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28.). There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996).  The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28; SugdenKato M, Shibata A, Yasui T, Nagamasu H. (1999). Impact of introduced honeybees, Apis mellifera, upon native bee communities in the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands.Researches on Population Ecology. 41, 217-228.). The interspecies competition is difficult to conclusively prove for a variety of reasons. However, of 24 major competition studies only two discounted competitive effects and even these authors did not dismiss the possibility of its existence (Buchmann).

Honeybees steal pollen and nectar from other pollinators, but honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant (Buchmann, S. (professor of entomology at the University of Arizona in Tucson) & Nabhan, G. (director of science at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) (1996).  The pollination crisis: the plight of the honey bee and the decline of other pollinators imperils future harvests (adapted from The Forgotten Pollinators). The Sciences, 36 (4), 22-28.).

Loss of the native pollinators would be bad because honeybees only pollinate 16-22% of all wild plants needing pollination (Roubik, D. (Smithsonian Tropical Resaerch Institute) (1996).  In A. Matheson et al. (eds.),  The Conservation of Bees.). In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees (Sugden).

Buchmann & Nabham conclude, “the honeybee has perhaps had as much impact as cattle on the structure of certain plant communities. It may be apocalyptic to claim that someday beekeeping with either European or Africanized honeybees will be discussed in the United States or Mexico with as much emotion as cowboying is today, but that is indeed our prophecy. [It is already true in Australia.] (Buchmann).

References bolded so you can see we’re not just ‘pulling this shit’.

 

Reblogged from hoe-hovahne  20 notes
animalsandtrees:

“American Humane Association and the world’s top veterinary experts are asking human carers/guardians (pet owners) across the US to exercise caution but not to panic following reports of the Ebola virus in animals such as Bentley, the King Charles Spaniel belonging to the Dallas nurse hospitalized with the disease.
"It is important to be vigilant if you live in an area close to an Ebola case, but not to overreact,” said Dr. Kwane Stewart, Chief Veterinary Officer for American Humane Association. “While some animals in Africa were shown to harbor antibodies after eating infected corpses or other animals, we do not have this situation in the United States and there is little evidence at this point to indicate transmission from animals to people.”
Fear of illness can lead to the deaths of animal companions without substantiated cause. In Spain, authorities recently ordered the killing and burning of a dog who lived with a medical professional who fell ill after treating Ebola patients in Africa.
The chance that dogs might spread Ebola is very small in the U.S. or other places where dogs aren’t near corpses or eating infected animals, American Veterinary Medical Association spokesperson Sharon Granskog told CBS.
 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports on its website, “At this time, there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able to spread Ebola to people or animals.”
 “As with any threat to ourselves or our animals, it is important to know what to do and what not to do,” said Dr. Stewart.  “At this point there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola even though they may develop antibodies from exposure to the disease. A greater understanding of the effects of Ebola on dogs and cats is needed to help prevent panic and their needless destruction.”
Source

animalsandtrees:

American Humane Association and the world’s top veterinary experts are asking human carers/guardians (pet owners) across the US to exercise caution but not to panic following reports of the Ebola virus in animals such as Bentley, the King Charles Spaniel belonging to the Dallas nurse hospitalized with the disease.

"It is important to be vigilant if you live in an area close to an Ebola case, but not to overreact,” said Dr. Kwane Stewart, Chief Veterinary Officer for American Humane Association. “While some animals in Africa were shown to harbor antibodies after eating infected corpses or other animals, we do not have this situation in the United States and there is little evidence at this point to indicate transmission from animals to people.”

Fear of illness can lead to the deaths of animal companions without substantiated cause. In Spain, authorities recently ordered the killing and burning of a dog who lived with a medical professional who fell ill after treating Ebola patients in Africa.

The chance that dogs might spread Ebola is very small in the U.S. or other places where dogs aren’t near corpses or eating infected animals, American Veterinary Medical Association spokesperson Sharon Granskog told CBS.

 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports on its website, “At this time, there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able to spread Ebola to people or animals.”

 “As with any threat to ourselves or our animals, it is important to know what to do and what not to do,” said Dr. Stewart.  “At this point there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola even though they may develop antibodies from exposure to the disease. A greater understanding of the effects of Ebola on dogs and cats is needed to help prevent panic and their needless destruction.”

Source

Reblogged from mare-vitae  45,436 notes

fortheloveoforca:

emptythetanks:

savethewailes:

sharkhugger:

Petition: Hong Kong Government: Legislate a ban on the sale and possession of shark fin in Hong Kong.

From Honduras to New Caledonia, from the Bahamas to the Maldives, the people have spoken. And governments have listened. Now is the time for Hong Kong to wake up! The public is ready. The business sector is behind us. Now is the time for a total sale and possession ban on shark fin in Hong Kong. By doing so, Hong Kong will take a giant step to join the conservation efforts of numerous countries around the world who have enacted shark protection legislation. In Latin America it will join Honduras. In the United States it will join California, New York, Hawaii, Washington, Maryland, Delaware and Oregon. In the Pacific region it will join Palau, Tokelau, Marshall Islands, French Polynesia, Cook Islands, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands and New Caledonia. Even China has agreed to stop serving shark fin soup at official banquets, to take effect in the next year or two.

Banning shark fin from the streets of Hong Kong will be the single most important marine conservation achievement of the year. It will be an important step towards protecting the health of our oceans. It will also remove the stain on Hong Kong’s reputation as a world-class tourism hub.

This petition is endorsed by: Shark Rescue

BALLSIEST. PETITION. EVER.

IF THERE WAS EVER A HEAD TO THIS DRAGON - THERE IT IS.
DO YOU KNOW WHAT A HUGE DIFFERENCE THIS WOULD MAKE??? WITHOUT THE ISSUE OF SHARK FIN SOUP WE COULD CONCENTRATE ON THE ISSUE OF BYCATCH AND SOLVE THIS ISSUE PERMANENTLY.

Save sharks! They are so important.

please sign the petition guys

Its a fucking blood bath! Sign this petition you guys!

Reblogged from montereybayaquarium  108 notes
montereybayaquarium:

Here’s your #ThrowbackThursday double take! The Aquarium sits on the site of Hovden Cannery, one of many that closed after the collapse of the sardine fishery. Our building mimics the cannery style and incorporates the original warehouse and boilers—now our main entrance. Can you tell which building is the Aquarium? 

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montereybayaquarium:

Here’s your #ThrowbackThursday double take! The Aquarium sits on the site of Hovden Cannery, one of many that closed after the collapse of the sardine fishery. Our building mimics the cannery style and incorporates the original warehouse and boilers—now our main entrance. Can you tell which building is the Aquarium? 

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